The holocaust had been reported to American and European officials as early as 1936. But the world didn’t really know what was occurring. That’s the way it works with a regime. Information doesn’t get in or out. The rest of the world simply knew that Nazi Germany was fighting other nations. When tales of the Holocaust did get out, it sounded so horrifying that people didn’t believe it could be possible. America thought it was just another European war and was none of our business. That’s why America stayed out of it for so long.

The same thing has been happening in Uganda for over 20 years now. It wasn’t until October of 2011 that President Obama authorized the deployment to Uganda of approximately 100 combat-equipped U.S. forces to help regional forces “remove from the battlefield” – meaning capture or kill – Lord’s Resistance Army leader Joseph Kony and senior leaders of the LRA.

The Lord’s Resistance Army preys on civilians – killing, raping, and mutilating the people of central Africa; stealing and brutalizing their children; and displacing hundreds of thousands of people.  Its leadership, indicted by the International Criminal Court for crimes against humanity, has no agenda and no purpose other than its own survival.  It fills its ranks of fighters with the young boys and girls it abducts.  By any measure, its actions are an affront to human dignity.  Even so, many Americans are still unaware of the atrocities committed by Joseph Kony and the LRA.

But not all remain unaware.  In the spring of 2003, three filmmakers, Jason Russell, Bobby Bailey, and Laren Poole, traveled to Africa to document the genocide that was occurring in Darfur. Instead, they stumbled upon a little-known war that originated in northern Uganda in 1987, making it Africa’s second longest-running war after the Eritrean Revolutionary War. They produced a documentary about the children being abducted and turned into child soldiers by Joseph Kony and the LRA.

In November 2011, a Foreign Affairs article reproached Invisible Children and some of its partner organizations for manipulating facts for strategic purposes and exaggerating the scale of LRA abductions and murders. And yet, Charity Navigator, a non-profit organization dedicated to intelligent giving gave Invisible Children three out of four stars and a rating of 51.52 out of a possible score of 70. Charity Navigator currently ranks Invisible Children two stars for accountability and transparency, and four stars financially.

If nothing else, Invisible Children has raised a loud voice against the injustice in Uganda. And its voice is spreading across the Internet. It has one goal in mind: Make Joseph Kony, the Ugandan leader of the violent Lord’s Resistance Army “famous” so he can be brought to justice.

The campaign may be working. #StopKony has been trending worldwide on Twitter since Tuesday, and as of this writing, the video “Kony2012” has almost two million views on YouTube.

On April 20, Invisible Children is calling on its supporters to stop Kony and the LRA’s campaign once and for all — by using the social media and viral tactics that have made “Kony2012” so widespread.

“This is the day when we will meet at sundown and blanket every street in every city until the sun comes up,” Jason Russell, who directed the film for Invisible Children, said in a statement. “The rest of the world will go to bed Friday night and wake up to hundreds of thousands of posters demanding justice.”

I encourage people of all faiths to let your voice be heard and to pray that God will bring and end to these atrocities.

 

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