Judges constantly hand down light sentences and probation to repeat offenders and place the public in danger.

When criminals are brought before judges for sentencing, judges should weigh factors including the severity of the crime, public safety, losses to the victims and their family and a defendant’s efforts to change—But all too often judges hand down light sentences to repeat offenders who often go on to commit even more violent crimes.

Consider the case of Marcus Wheeler-Cop Killer

In 2008, Marcus Wheeler was sentenced to five years in federal prison for possession of cocaine with intent to distribute. Wheeler was also charged as an accessory in a June 2007 slaying and was accused of shooting at an inhabited home, attempting to cause serious bodily injury to Ashley Bordeaux. Charges in both shooting cases were dismissed and Wheeler got out of prison on supervised release in 2013, but that was later revoked (For unpublished reasons) and he was returned to prison.

Wheeler was again released in February 2014. On May 20, 2015 officer Kerrie Orozco was shot and killed by Wheeler who was being served a warrant by the Omaha police department’s Fugitive Task Force. Officer Orozco left behind a husband and his two children as well as their newborn baby. The woman who was an accomplice in Kerrie Orozco’s murder by purchasing the gun for Wheeler, was sentenced by the Alabama judge to only probation!

The case of Eswin Mejia

Police say he was drunk, his blood-alcohol content more than three times the legal limit, when he was street racing near 33rd and L streets last month. Eswin Mejia was driving with a suspended license and was in the country illegally when he crashed into an SUV and killed 21-year-old Sarah Root. Mejia was allegedly street racing and driving drunk before crashing into the back of Sara’s SUV. The loss has left the 21-year-old’s friends and family with profound grief.

To make matters worse, Mejia was scheduled for a preliminary hearing, but never made it to court after the judge set Mejia’s bond at only $50,000! The judge revoked Mejia’s $50,000 bond when he failed to appear. (A little too late for that now)

Cases like this happen all too often. And as disturbing as cases like these are, it has become even more common for judges to hand down probation to those convicted of sexual child abuse.

Research conducted by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that approximately 1 in 6 boys and 1 in 4 girls are sexually abused before the age of 18. An estimated 60% of perpetrators of child sexual abuse are known to the child. (family friends, care givers or neighbors) Out of those, at least half of the perpetrators are family members or step parents.

Sadly, only a fraction of these perpetrators who are apprehended and convicted of their crimes are sentenced to jail. Most convicted child sex offenders are only sentenced to probation and ordered to register as a sex offender.

Let me make myself clear: I don’t believe that the Sex Offender Registry Law should be applied to curious children or hormonal teens that get caught sexting to their boyfriends or girlfriends. (This can be corrected with training, discipline and therapy) This is about adults who knowingly sexually victimize under age children.

The police do their job and arrest these criminals; the prosecutors do their job and convict them, but then the judges hand down light sentences or probation that allows them to re-offend.

Why? Because crimes, whether they are against children or other adults, do not personally affect judges. It’s the same reason that people are not too concerned with the first four of the Ten Commandments.

It doesn’t personally affect me if you:

  1. worship other gods.
  2. make for yourself an idol.
  3. take the name of the Lord in vain.
  4. don’t remember the Sabbath and keep it holy.

But notice what happens with the last 5 commandments:

5. Honor your father and mother

6. You shall not murder

7. You shall not commit adultery

8. You shall not steal

9. You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor

10. You shall not covet your neighbor’s wife or anything that belongs to your neighbor.

These are things that we don’t want happening to us, (They personally affect us) so we tend to place more importance on them and expect harsher punishment for those who disobey them.

Judges need to realize the risk that they pose to the public when they give offenders light sentences and be more concerned that the person they release back on the street will be the next one they read about in the newspaper.

We can send a strong message to the court system when we go to the polls to vote by voting “NO” to retain judges.

“Woe to those who enact evil statutes And to those who constantly record unjust decisions, So as to deprive the needy of justice And rob the poor of My people of their rights.” (Isaiah 10:1-2)

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