The Lost Art of Studying the Scriptures

Posted: July 21, 2016 in Christian Living
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“All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works.” (2 Timothy 3:16-17 KJV)

I have heard many Christians quote that verse in 2 Timothy when discussing if the Bible is true. Some modern versions even translate that verse as, “All scripture is God breathed…” And yet most Christians today rarely (if ever) have read anything other than the New Testament writings.

We must remember that when the apostle Paul wrote his second letter to Timothy, the only Scripture that was available at the time was the Tanakh; the first Hebrew letter of each of the Masoretic Text’s three traditional subdivisions: Torah (“Teaching”, also known as the Five Books of Moses), Nevi’im (“Prophets”) and Ketuvim (“Writings”) hence the name, TaNaKh. It is also known that the majority of the things that Paul wrote in his letters were taken from the Tanakh, or the Old Testament.

So am I saying that the New Testament writings are not inspired by God? Certainly not. But I don’t believe that the New Testament writings are any more inspired by God than say, the writings of John Bunyan, George Whitfield, Charles Finney, Andrew Murray and so many others.

But for someone to read only the New Testament writings is like reading a Bible commentary without studying the verses themselves. And yet, so many do exactly that when they only rely on pastors to explain snippets of Bible verses from the pulpit on Sunday mornings.

If you ask anyone who knows the story of the great flood, “Did Noah warn the people?” Most people would answer something like, “Yes, he warned them that a flood was coming and preached for them to repent for 100 years but the people didn’t believe him and even laughed at him.” But after searching the Scriptures I could not find anything conclusive which indicates that Noah said anything to anyone about the impending judgement to come. And there’s a good reason why.

In Genesis 6: 2-8 we read: “When man began to multiply on the face of the land and daughters were born to them, the sons of God saw that the daughters of man were attractive. And they took as their wives any they chose…”

It goes on to say that the Nephilim (the offspring of the sons of God i.e.; fallen angels) were on the earth in those days and because of this, the wickedness of man became so great that every intention of the thoughts of people’s heart was only evil continually. So much so that God regretted that he had even created man on the earth. So the Lord said, “I will blot out man whom I have created from the face of the land, man and animals and creeping things and birds of the heavens, for I am sorry that I have made them.” But verse 9 states that, “Noah was a righteous man, blameless in his generation.”

Many have been taught that Noah was the only person on earth at that time who was without sin, but the Bible states that there in no one who is righteous. (Ecclesiastes 7:20, Psalm 143:2, Romans 3:10) So what could this mean for Noah? Strong’s translates the Hebrew word  for “blameless” (H8549) as: without blemish, perfect, without spot.

The Nephilim were doing such a good job of breeding with humans and creating more Nephilim that the human bloodline was almost completely destroyed. God saw the corruption and knew that the only way to get rid of it was to destroy the earth and everything on it. But then God noticed Noah; a blameless man—a man whose bloodline had not been corrupted by the Nephilim—i.e.; without blemish.

When the door to the Ark was shut, there was probably room for more people. But if everyone else on earth were corrupted by the Nephillim, why would God want Noah to warn them so that they could storm the ark at the last minute? Both 1 Peter 3:20 and Genesis 6:3 indicate that God waited a period of time before judgement, but not that they were warned of the coming judgement. Why? Perhaps God wanted to protect Noah and his family from the wicked people and Nephillim who would no doubt pollute their bloodline. Notice that there was only one door—which was not closed by Noah, but by God. (Genesis 7:16)

Often when preachers teach things about Scripture they make unbiblical assumptions when they try to fill in some gaps and we end up repeating them as truth. I am amazed at how most people today get their ideas about the Bible from movies, TV specials and greeting cards and how little is said about the the importance of the deep study of Scripture.

Some may say, “But I don’t understand a lot of the Bible; so I have to rely on my pastor or other more experienced Bible scholars to explain it to me.” Then you need to repent of your laziness, go out and buy yourself a Strong’s Concordance (or go to one of the many online Bible sites) and set aside some time to really study the Bible.

Noah heard God and believed and obeyed him by faith.The Apostle Paul writes, “For by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God, not of works, lest anyone should boast.” (Eph. 2:8–9)

This is exactly how Noah was saved. Not because he more righteous spiritually than anyone else, but because he had faith in God. Noah realized that he could only be saved by God’s grace, through faith. Genesis 6:8 tells us that “Noah found grace in the eyes of the Lord.” Noah’s salvation, like ours, was by grace. Had Noah not listened and obeyed God through faith, he and his family would have been destroyed with all the rest.

I discovered a great truth in studying the story of Noah and the great flood in Scripture.

Included in God’s instructions for building the ark, God told Noah, “Make yourself an ark of gopher wood. Make rooms in the ark, and cover it inside and out with pitch.” (Gen. 6:14) Strong’s translates the Hebrew word for “pitch” as atonement. (H3722)

You see, pitch was used on the ark to prevent anything on the outside (water) from getting into the inside. So Noah and his family were literally protected by the atonement God directed Noah to apply to the ark! And just like Noah and his family were protected by the atonement covering the ark, we too, by faith, are protected by Jesus’ atonement. And by grace through faith in Jesus, when we repent and turn from our sins, Jesus’ atonement prevents anything on the outside (sin, and worldliness) from getting into the inside of us.

We read in Matthew 24:36-39 that Jesus said, “But of that day and hour no one knows, not even the angels of heaven, but My Father only. Just as the days of Noah were, so also will the coming of the Son of Man be. For as in the days before the flood, they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noah entered the ark, and did not know until the flood came and took them all away, so also will the coming of the Son of Man be.”

As we see what is happening in the world today, can there be any doubt that we are living “as the days of Noah”? But unlike the days of Noah, you don’t have to be left unaware until tit’s too late. Repent, turn from your wickedness and be cleansed and transformed by God’s atonement through his son, Jesus.

This is true for Christians as well as unbelievers. God wants more from you than just your belief in him. He wants you to act on your faith by living it out in every part of your life. That’s the only way you can grow closer to God and let others know that your faith is real, so they’ll be inspired to seek God themselves.

Casting Crowns – Jesus, Friend of Sinners

The Church today needs to follow the advice of this song. Love first and stop judging others who don’t yet know God and the salvation that is available to them through His son, Jesus. We get so caught up in trying to change a person that we sometimes forget why we are here—to show others His love.

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