Archive for the ‘Other Voices’ Category

Over the years I have written songs with lyricist Tom White, who is also my longtime friend and brother in Christ. Even though we are now miles apart we still collaborate on songs through the internet. He recently sent me lyrics to use in a song. I will be working on the music in the coming days, but the words are so intensely descriptive that I couldn’t wait to share them with you.

These Hands by Tom White

They reached down to pick her up, dry her tears then tenderly lifted her off the ground/They brushed off her clothes so gently and then lovingly placed her on the Merry go round/They offer her some ice cream or some candy, a vile threat presented as a special treat/ Warning her that if she shares this secret with anyone she’ll get hurt and end up alone on the street

And those hands—hands that are meant to protect are used to abuse, to injure, and neglect/And those hands—hands that are meant to defend/They rush to crush life to bring about its end/Who will protect the innocent? Who will raise their voice for the silent one? Who will, without fail, shine a light to expose the unspeakable things in shadows done?

Forty five minutes off the bus she finds the streets are cruel/She ran from the prison called home to find more of the same/Her body becomes a token used over and over again by men and women too many to name/She cries out to God for mercy, hoping against hope Where the thought of escape becomes a nightly dream/But each day she’s bought and sold like a piece of meat/And all she can do is silently scream

And those hands—hands that are meant to protect/Are used to abuse, to injure, and neglect/And those hands—hands that are meant to defend/They rush to crush life to bring about its end/Who will protect the innocent? Who will raise their voice for the silent one? Who will, without fail, shine a light to expose the unspeakable things in shadows done?

Your life goes on while children are defiled/The sex traffic lights are all blinking green/If you ignore it soon enough it should go away/Then the problem will be unheard, unknown and unseen/But Christ hears the cries of the least of these/And calls us to be his voice, his hands and feet/To live outside the stained glass windows/So that we, like him, can hear the cries from the street

So that hands—our hands, can truly protect/We can lift up and encourage and deflect/Yes those hands—your hands, can defend/ Like a shepherd, like a brother, like a friend/Protecting the innocent starts with you/Raise your voice and speak up for the silent one/Shine a light so bright that it will expose/The unspeakable things in shadows done

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Miryam Rabinowitz is a filmmaker on the east coast who spearheaded “Still Feeling” as an experiment based on her own experiences of childhood sexual abuse. What she found in the research about healing from child sexual abuse was the power of interconnectivity. And that the greatest threat to a victim’s healing process is isolation. The emotional disconnect between victims and their families and communities can be attributed to fear, and an inability to relate to one another.

This film features four artists who are elevating their experiences of child sexual abuse through artistic expression and demonstrate the beauty of human resilience. Rabinowitz  started a Kickstarter campaign where she still needs to raise $15,000 of her $25,000 goal. These funds will be used to begin the production of her first segment.

The goal is for this documentary is for victims to feel validated, and for the people around them to be able to say, “Now I understand.”  

Click here to become a supporter, and visit her website at: www.stillfeeling.org to learn more out the film.

I sympathize with the children who have made the long and dangerous trek across our borders from Mexico and Central America. If I were a child surrounded by gang violence and drug cartels I don’t know that I wouldn’t illegally cross a border in order to be safe. But since President Obama has opened the flood gates for these children there has been many documented cases of communicable diseases brought over our borders.

Why not treat these children BEFORE shipping them to various parts of our country knowingly exposing them to other children in our schools as well as other  undocumented children?   I would think that Michelle Obama would be all over this, considering her stance on improving children’s health.

The link below describes what I’ve been wondering since news of the outbreak of entrovirus in many schools…

http://citizenwells.wordpress.com/2014/09/09/obama-responsible-for-spread-of-enterovirus-and-other-diseases-by-illegal-alien-children-from-central-america-obama-ignored-warnings-from-prominent-health-officials-obama-more-concerned-about-electi/

FEAR, PTSD, and the Abused Woman (Part 1 of Fear) (2 Tim. 1:7).

(Re-posted from http://secretangelps911.wordpress.com/)

I recently read an article by Elizabeth Ester  about children who have been “chastised” to death after parents followed the “Biblical” child-training methods of Michael & Debi Pearl.

Elizabeth Ester states that she escaped from an abusive fundamentalist church after years of being influenced by its teachings. So she naturally writes from that prospective.

Whenever I read articles like this I am always reminded of the day the Lord taught me and my son a very important lesson about grace. When my son, Sean was very young he became angry with me when I told him it was time to come inside from playing with his friends.

After many warnings and threats from me Sean reluctantly agreed to come inside. Angrily storming inside, Sean swatted at my prized guitar I had leaning against a wall and then watched in horror as it fell to the floor, snapping off its neck. Staring at my mangled guitar on the floor and without looking up, I very slowly and quietly told Sean, “Go to your room; I’m gonna hurt you.”

After allowing myself several minutes to calm down, I went to Sean’s room to find him hysterically crying. (Knowing in his mind, I was about to end his life.) After calming him to an uncontrollable whimper, I asked him, “Sean do you know what judgment is?” He answered in that little kid whimper voice, when they try to stop crying and take short deep breaths between each word, “N-n-n-o.” I explained to him that judgment is getting what you deserve.

He immediately began sobbing uncontrollably all over again. (Now being perfectly convinced in his mind that he was about to die!) After calming him down once again I asked him, “Sean, do you know what grace is?” He again answered, “N-n-n-no.” I immediately picked him up and put him on my lap and hugged him and said, “THIS is grace.”

What does it really mean to “spare the rod, spoil the child”?

Although it’s not written in the Bible exactly that way, the phrase “spare the rod, spoil the child” comes from Proverbs 13:24, “He who spares the rod hates his son, but he who loves him is careful to discipline him.”

The Lord uses discipline to reveal our sin to us. This is also how we, as parents, should reveal to our children how God expects us to live and our need for a Savior. When children do not realize the consequence of their sin, they will not understand that sin requires punishment. God provides a way to salvation and forgiveness through Jesus, but that means little to those who do not see their sin. Furthermore, correction shows us that we are accountable for our actions. Our natural pride blinds us to our need for a Savior, but discipline reveals the truth of our wretchedness. (Revelation 3:17)

Since salvation is the most important choice the child will ever make, it is imperative that parents are leading them to Christ, and discipline is critical to this process. Proverbs 23:13 says, “Do not withhold discipline from a child; if you punish him with the rod, he will not die.” In the context of verses 13-18, “die” means spiritual death. Children who respect authority and feel sorrow for their sin are much more likely to ask Jesus to forgive them and be saved.

Some people don’t believe in any type of physical discipline such as spanking. Others, like Michael & Debbi Pearl and their followers allow the pendulum to swing the complete opposite direction and misinterpret Scripture’s definition of a rod.

The word “rod” mentioned in Proverbs indicates a thin stick or switch that can be used to give a small amount of physical pain with no lasting physical injury. It is intended to steer the heart of a child toward Jesus and forgiveness of sin. A child should never be bruised, injured, or cut by a physical correction. The Bible warns us that we should never abuse the power and authority we have over our children while they are young because it could provoke them to anger. (Ephesians 6:4; Colossians 3:21) Physical discipline should always be done in love and never in a moment of frustration. It is also just one part of discipline and should be used only when the child shows repeated intentional defiance to a clear limit.

God instructs us to discipline our children the same way He disciplines us. Hebrews 12:5-11 tells us that God disciplines those whom He loves to perfect their righteousness. God only disciplines His own, which proves that if we repent and surrender to Him, we are His beloved children. And we can say with David that the Lord’s rod comforts us in our time of trouble. (Psalm 23:4)

Finally, we know that no discipline feels good while it is happening, but afterwards the rewards are rich. (Hebrews 12:11) Godly character, fruit of the spirit, and peace are the rewards of God’s discipline. The same is true for our children who have learned from godly discipline, how to take responsibility for their actions. And they will grow up to be much happier people. (Proverbs 3:11-18)

Resources: Parenting Is Heart Work by Dr. Scott Turansky & Joanne Miller

Got Questions.org   – http://www.gotquestions.org/

William Booth was born in Sneinton, Nottingham, the only son of four surviving children born to Samuel Booth and Mary Moss. William’s father was wealthy by the standards of the time, but during William’s childhood, as a result of bad investments, the family descended into poverty and his father became an alcoholic. In 1842, Samuel Booth, who by then was bankrupt, could no longer afford his son’s school fees, and 13-year-old William was apprenticed to a pawnbroker. Samuel Booth died later that same year.

William Booth did not enjoy his job in the pawnbroker’s shop, but it made him only too aware of the poverty in which people lived and how they suffered humiliation and degradation because of it. Two years into his apprenticeship William Booth was converted and later became an evangelist. One day in 1865 he found himself in the East End of London, preaching to crowds of people in the streets outside the ‘Blind Beggar Pub’.

Slowly the mission began to grow but the work was hard and William would stumble home night after night haggard with fatigue, often with his clothes torn and bloody bandages wrapped on his head where a stone had struck him. Evening meetings were held in an old warehouse where urchins threw stones and fireworks through the window. It was not until 1878 when ‘The Christian Mission’ changed its name to ‘The Salvation Army’ that things began to happen. The idea of an Army fighting sin caught the imagination of the people and the Army began to grow rapidly. Booth’s fiery sermons and sharp imagery drove the message home and more and more people found themselves willing to leave their past behind and start a new life as a soldier in The Salvation Army.

Jesus commands us to go and make disciples of all nations. Sadly, many organizations like the Salvation Army, whose primary purpose began with winning souls and discipling new converts, have either become not much more than another social service program or have altogether dissolved.  Where are the William Booths–the Keith Greens–or the Leonard Ravenhills of today?

I fear they have been replaced with televangelists, computers, and iPhones. Our technology today gives us the ability to reach millions of people at once but it seems we don’t take the time to reach out to our neighbors right next door! And with all of our technology we’re no different today than we were during William Booth’s day:

In William Booth’s own words:

I pray that we all become more serious about the souls of mankind and Stand By The Door…

I Stand at the Door by Sam Shoemaker (from the Oxford Group)

I stand by the door.
I neither go to far in, nor stay to far out.
The door is the most important door in the world –
It is the door through which men walk when they find God.
There is no use my going way inside and staying there,
When so many are still outside and they, as much as I,
Crave to know where the door is.
And all that so many ever find
Is only the wall where the door ought to be.
They creep along the wall like blind men,
With outstretched, groping hands,
Feeling for a door, knowing there must be a door,
Yet they never find it.
So I stand by the door.

The most tremendous thing in the world
Is for men to find that door – the door to God.
The most important thing that any man can do
Is to take hold of one of those blind, groping hands
And put it on the latch – the latch that only clicks
And opens to the man’s own touch.

Men die outside the door, as starving beggars die
On cold nights in cruel cities in the dead of winter.
Die for want of what is within their grasp.
They live on the other side of it – live because they have not found it.

Nothing else matters compared to helping them find it,
And open it, and walk in, and find Him.
So I stand by the door.

Go in great saints; go all the way in –
Go way down into the cavernous cellars,
And way up into the spacious attics.
It is a vast, roomy house, this house where God is.
Go into the deepest of hidden casements,
Of withdrawal, of silence, of sainthood.
Some must inhabit those inner rooms
And know the depths and heights of God,
And call outside to the rest of us how wonderful it is.
Sometimes I take a deeper look in.
Sometimes venture in a little farther,
But my place seems closer to the opening.
So I stand by the door.

There is another reason why I stand there.
Some people get part way in and become afraid
Lest God and the zeal of His house devour them;
For God is so very great and asks all of us.
And these people feel a cosmic claustrophobia
And want to get out. ‘Let me out!’ they cry.
And the people way inside only terrify them more.
Somebody must be by the door to tell them that they are spoiled.
For the old life, they have seen too much:
One taste of God and nothing but God will do any more.
Somebody must be watching for the frightened
Who seek to sneak out just where they came in,
To tell them how much better it is inside.
The people too far in do not see how near these are
To leaving – preoccupied with the wonder of it all.
Somebody must watch for those who have entered the door
But would like to run away. So for them too,
I stand by the door.

I admire the people who go way in.
But I wish they would not forget how it was
Before they got in. Then they would be able to help
The people who have not yet even found the door.
Or the people who want to run away again from God.
You can go in too deeply and stay in too long
And forget the people outside the door.
As for me, I shall take my old accustomed place,
Near enough to God to hear Him and know He is there,
But not so far from men as not to hear them,
And remember they are there too.

Where? Outside the door –
Thousands of them. Millions of them.
But – more important for me –
One of them, two of them, ten of them.
Whose hands I am intended to put on the latch.
So I shall stand by the door and wait
For those who seek it.

I had rather be a door-keeper… So I stand by the door.

 

I came across this article of a police officer giving boots to barefoot homeless man in New York. Had it not been for a tourist from Arizona who snapped a picture of this officer’s generous good deed no one may have ever known about it. Although there have been many complaints about the police, (and many might be well founded) I wonder how many of those who complain about the police walked by this poor man oblivious to his condition? It reminds me of the parable Jesus told in  Luke 10:25-37

Photo of police officer giving boots to barefoot man warms hearts online.