Posts Tagged ‘child abuse’

In all, only 27 states have rules restricting how close sex offenders can live to schools and other places where groups of children may gather, according to research by the Council of State Governments.

But these laws are based on the myth that there is a stranger who is lurking in the bushes and dark alleys and grabbing children off the street. When in fact, less than 10% of all child sex abuse cases are perpetrated by strangers. Over 90% of child sexual abuse cases are committed by someone the child knows well. And over 60% are committed by a family member. In nearly all cases involving a family member sexually assaulting a child, the perpetrator is only sentenced to probation—And many times is allowed to return to the home where the crime took place!

A U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics study in 2003, the most recent available, found that 5.3 percent of inmates released from prison after being convicted of a sex offense are arrested for another sexual offense within three years. Although researchers generally acknowledge that the recidivism rate may be much higher because these crimes are often underreported.

The Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA) which is Title I of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006, was supposed to provide a new comprehensive set of minimum standards for sex offender registration and notification in the United States. These Guidelines were issued to provide guidance and assistance to covered jurisdictions—the 50 States, the District of Columbia, the principal U.S. territories, and Indian tribal governments—in implementing the SORNA standards in their sex offender registration and notification programs. But these requirements are only informational in nature and do not restrict where sex offenders can live. (https://www.smart.gov/pdfs/final_sornaguidelines.pdf)

For example, The Nebraska Sex Offender Registration law does not have any restrictions on registered sex offenders. Again, this is a common misperception. The SOR law also does not have the legal jurisdiction to prevent an offender from attending events, limiting employment, restrict an offender from entering any facilities, or refrain from living with or socializing with children or vulnerable persons. The SOR law can only mandate that the offender register his or her required information under statutes 29-4004 and 29-4006 at the sheriff’s office within the required time.

That means that someone who has been convicted of sexually abusing a child in Nebraska and is sentenced to probation is free to attend or work in schools, children museums, daycare centers and even live with other vulnerable children!

Many people have been told that if you want changes in laws and policies you need to write to your senator. Well, I have written to over 20 Nebraska state senators, the governor, the Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos and even President Donald Trump, asking them to change the SOR laws in order to better protect victims of child sexual abuse from their abusers. Sadly, most did not respond. And the few that did respond, told me that there was nothing that they could do. Nothing that they could do?!

A senator is called, among other thing to:

  • Represent the people and the best interests of his or her legislative district.
  • Protect property and persons, strengthen our productive capacity, and create new opportunities.
  • Right injustices involving the public.
  • Establish state policy by introducing bills to create new programs, modify existing programs, and repeal laws which are no longer needed.

Two senators told me that I should contact the Nebraska Inspector General about the SOR. But according to its website, the OIG does not have the authority or ability to look into complaints relating to the court process, such as decisions made by judges, the conduct of attorneys, or immediate concerns about the safety of children. http://oig.legislature.ne.gov/?page_id=15

I wrote one Senator and asked how I could address the Nebraska Legislature myself on the subject of Child Sexual Abuse and the SOR laws and he responded by telling me:

“ The podium is under the authority of the Speaker of the Legislature…it is highly unlikely that the speaker would approve of such a request.”

If this is true, then why is it that on the Nebraska Legislature’s website it states:

“At public hearings, citizens have an opportunity within the time available to make their views known or have them incorporated into the official committee record. In Nebraska, gubernatorial appointments and most bills, with the exception of a few technical bills, receive a public hearing by one of the Legislature’s committees.” http://nebraskalegislature.gov/about/testifying.php

If a senator is called to, “Establish state policy by introducing bills to create new programs, modify existing programs, and repeal laws which are no longer needed”, but introduce bills that do more to protect sex offenders than their victims, then the prophecy of Isaiah 5:20 has come true: “Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter!”

In February of this year Nebraska State Senator Patty Pansing Brooks of Lincoln introduced Legislative Bill 289 that would require anyone trafficking an adult and soliciting a trafficked adult to carry a minimum of a year and a maximum of 50 years in prison. “When you consider the horrors of this crime, probation is nothing more than a slap on the wrist,” she said.

Senator Brett Linstom also introduced a bill that would require non-custodial parents be notified if a sex offender is living with or has unsupervised access to their child.

And yet, neither of these bills does anything to deter those who commit these heinous crimes against children, nor do they do anything to protect the victims. But…they make good sound bites and help them get re-elected.

But it’s not just our politicians who are to blame. There are many who have taken to the streets protesting for the rights of women, for the LGBT community, for religious freedom, and even for the right to spread hateful propaganda. But no one is taking to the streets to protest against the 1 in 5 children who are abused, molested and raped in their own homes every day—Or the judges who only sentence the perpetrators to probation for their crime!

Sadly, there are stricter punishments and restrictions for those who abuse animals than for those who abuse children!

Almost everyone has seen the ASPCA’s heart wrenching TV commercial that portrays abused and neglected dogs and cats. The use of emotion in the commercial is clearly evident. What better way to urge viewers to donate money than by showing pictures of sorry-looking, hurt animals with Sarah McLachlan’s song, ‘In The Arms Of An Angel’ playing in the background? I have to admit that it is a very moving, emotional, (and productive) commercial. The ASPCA garnered over $30 million from that commercial.

Very few people won’t cringe at the sight of the graphic images featuring badly injured animals in crates and cages.

But maybe the next time you see that commercial try to think of the more than 300,000 children who are abused and neglected in the same way (and worse) every year in this country.

Of course if someone made a commercial about abused children using the same method as the ASPCA, it would probably be banned from TV. (If it even was allowed to be aired to begin with)

We have truly become what what described in the Bible as living in the last days:

“But understand this, that in the last days there will come times of difficulty. For people will be lovers of self, lovers of money, proud, arrogant, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, heartless, unappeasable, slanderous, without self-control, brutal, not loving good, treacherous, reckless, swollen with conceit, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, having the appearance of godliness, but denying its power.” (2 Timothy 3: 1-5)

Jesus said, “Whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin, it would be better for him to have a great millstone fastened around his neck and to be drowned in the depth of the sea.” (Matthew 18:6) How many sermons have you heard denouncing child sexual abuse?

I for one, will not stop advocating on behalf of those children who have been treated worse than animals. I will not go quietly into the night. I will not turn back. I will continue to be a voice for those who are afraid to speak.

What will you do?

“Therefore, to one who knows the right thing to do and does not do it, to him it is sin.” (James 4:17)

Read correspondence below:

Sample Letter to Senators

Response from Sara Howard

Response From Governor

Response From Don Bacon

Response from Brett Lindstrom

Letter to Betsy DeVoss

Letter From Sec. of Ed

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unknownThousands of children throughout America suffer physical abuse and neglect each day. Research conducted by the Centers for Disease Control estimates that approximately 1 in 6 boys and 1 in 4 girls are sexually abused in their own homes by family members, step-parents or caregivers. (That is according to reported incidences, so the actual number could be even higher) Many of these victims can suffer from psychological, emotional, and physical effects that carry over well into adulthood—including anxiety Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and self-destructive behaviors such as alcoholism or drug abuse. But there are some, with the help of caring friends and family and professional counseling, who can not only survive childhood abuse, but overcome it and thrive. This is a story of one such person. I’ll call her Shelby. (Her real name was changed to protect her privacy)

Shelby’s Story

When I was about 5 years old I lived in New Mexico with my mom and her boyfriend. That’s when I first remember him physically abusing my mother. He was often cruel to animals too. I had a black kitten that I loved very much. My mom’s boyfriend didn’t like the kitten because it kept scratching him, but not me or my mom. So one day when me and my mom went to the store, he killed it by throwing it into the washing machine. After he killed it, he threw it over the fence in our back yard. I was traumatized after we found out, but my Mom told me not to tell anyone.

When I was in kindergarten a friend of mine and his mom came to visit at our house. My mom, her boyfriend and my friend’s mom were all drinking together. While me and my friend (who was a boy) were in my room, without warning, he suddenly pulled down his pants. (As little boys sometimes do) I thought he was just weird, but when the boy’s mom saw what he did, she told my mom and her boyfriend. Then, as if I did something wrong, my mom’s boyfriend grabbed me by my ankles and swung me around the room and threw me into a wall! To my shock and amazement my mom just sat there and watched it happen and did nothing to stop him!

When I was 6 years old we moved to Colorado. My mom’s boyfriend was still abusing her—Even when she was pregnant! I was often subjected to watch as my mother got punched and slapped in the face. Fortunately, my mom was still able to gave birth to two healthy twins—A boy and a girl. But because I didn’t want them to get hurt, I took it upon myself to take care of the twins. So I was the one feeding them, watching over them them and making sure that they were safe.

Things got worse after my mom and her boyfriend got married and he became my step-father. When I was 8 years old he made me smoke a cigarette with him and drink beer. Another time he sat me down and told me “his version” of the birds and the bees. It included looking down my pants and telling me that when I was by myself I should finger myself!

One time when my mom just got home from work, my step-father jumped on top of her and started choking her until her face turned purple before he finally let her go. It was one of the scariest experience of my life at that time. I had no idea that things would get much worse.

Later that same year when I was in my nightgown, my mom was working and my new step-father was drunk. He pushed me down on a pull-out bed and wouldn’t let me get up. He then got on top of me and tried raping me! He held down my wrists and was trying to make me believe that it was a game. I can still remember the smell of alcohol on him. When I began to scream and I tell him to get off, he suddenly stopped, but he was laughing about it like he was only kidding. This was the first time he had done something like this. Because of my step-father’s violent temper, I was afraid of what he might do if I told my mom, so I never said anything.

As time went on, my step-father’s alcohol and drug abuse continued to get worse. One time me and my mom left to run some errands and do some grocery shopping. But because we took longer than my step-father expected us to, we came back to discover that he had trashed the whole house in a drunken rage.

When I was 9 years old we moved back to New Mexico. My step-father’s abuse continued to get worse and worse. When my brother was only three years old, my step-father grabbed him by the shirt and slammed him against the arm of the couch just because he accidentally spilled some pop on him while he was sleeping.

Another time he tried coming after me. So I ran into a bedroom and jumped around on the bed so he wouldn’t hit me. My mom saw what he was trying to do, and pushed him away from me. He then turned his anger towards my mom started abusing her again. My siblings became frightened and started crying, so I locked us inside of the bedroom so my step-father wouldn’t harm my brother and sister. I tried to calm them down by singing to them.

Later that year my mom became pregnant again with my youngest sister. But that did not stop my step-father’s abuse. One night he punched my mom twice in the face and knocked her out. She didn’t wake up all night. I stayed up most of the night waiting for her to wake up. I finally went to sleep that night wondering if she was dead. But the next morning she was fine and acted as if nothing happened.

Only 6 months after moving from Colorado to New Mexico we moved again. This time to Washington State to live with my grandma (My mom’s mother) and her two sons. We lived there for about 1 year. It wasn’t any easier there because my step-father was always causing problems with my uncles and other people in the household. My grandma does not allow anyone to drink in the house, but he did anyway.

One time when my grandma and uncles were gone, my step-father and my mom got into another fight. At first they were just arguing and yelling about something. Then it escalated into pushing and shoving. Before it got worse, my mom dialed the police but when my step-father tried to grab the phone from my mom, his arm went through the window and cut his arm. He was able to end the call, but of course the police came anyway. Because my step-father was bleeding and my mom didn’t have any marks on her, the police arrested her for domestic violence. Me and my siblings were all crying but my step-father just yelled at us to stop crying and told us that my mom would be back soon. But it wasn’t until three days later that my mom came back home.

During the summer that we lived in Washington things got worse. My step-father wasn’t contributing much to the household because what little money he had went to pay for beer and marijuana. The problems he caused between my uncles and my grandma got worse, so we moved again.

This time we moved to Nebraska and lived with my other grandpa (my mom’s father) and his wife for about 6 months. My grandparents in Omaha have very strong Christian beliefs and told my parents that they don’t allow alcohol or drugs in their home or smoking inside the house. They are very kind people who did all they could to help us. They even bought new beds and dressers for all of us. They also converted their garage into a bedroom for my mom and step-father.

My grandparents gave us a warm and caring place to stay, cooked and cleaned for us and never asked for rent or grocery money. They even helped my step-father find a job. But while we lived there, my step-father secretly continued drinking and smoking in the basement. He was still abusive to us; he just hid it from my grandparents better. One time during a family reunion celebration my grandparents held in their back yard, my step-father made me put my hands on a pole that was in the basement and beat me with a belt several times. Everyone was outside playing, shouting and laughing, so they couldn’t hear what was going on inside. Finally after he was done, I dropped to the ground crying. I didn’t tell anyone because I was afraid that if I did, my grandparents would make us move.

Soon after that, we moved into a nasty 3 bedroom house that had mold all over. Because of the mold, we were always sick and would get bad coughs. My step-father and my mom smoking inside the house didn’t help either. Our neighbors next door were alcoholics and my mom and step-father would drink with them a lot.

My mom and step-father made the decision to have my step-father’s two older daughters (from a previous marriage in Colorado) move in with us. Although the house was a bit cramped, my brother and sisters and I grew much closer. We didn’t think of ourselves as a step-brother and 5 step-sisters. In our minds we were all family. I think having us all in one place made my step-father even more abusive though. One time when my young sister accidentally scratched the TV, he took her into the bathroom and spanked her with a belt so many times that she had welts on her back and legs. He would also grab the little ones by the wrist so rough that he would leave bruises on them. Many times he would get mad at us kids for reasons unknown to us. Most of us would get scared and run, but when he physically abused my oldest sister, she would fight back like crazy.

Then when I was 11years old, the very worst thing happened to me. One night my step-father was drinking again. I was going to bed and he said, “I’ll be there in a while”. I didn’t know what he meant by that at the time. I woke up suddenly at 3 AM to find my step-father in my bed lying next to me with his hand down the front of my pants! I freaked out and ran into the other room to lay on the couch. I didn’t know what to think. Then about two weeks later I fell asleep in front of the TV and it happened again! I freaked out again and cried and cried. When I finally got the courage to tell my mom, my step-father called me a f**kin’ liar and told me that I made it up. I was shocked and angered when all my mom said was that I should not watch movies next to my step-father anymore. As if it was MY fault!  Even my sisters didn’t believe me. After that I felt all alone.

We stayed in Nebraska about two years before we moved back to New Mexico to live with my step-father’s Grandmother, who pretty much let him do whatever he wanted. I hated it there. I was bullied in the school there and my oldest sister was fighting with my mom and her husband more and more. Sometimes they would even beat on her together.

Later, all of us siblings (except for my baby sister), were sent back to Washington to stay with my grandma and my uncles again. It was supposed to only be for the summer, but we ended up staying there for over a year and going to school there. I started hanging out with the wrong crowd, getting into fights, getting into trouble and doing poorly in school. I was angry all the time, but I didn’t know why.

Then my grandparents in Nebraska wanted me and my older sister to come and visit them for the summer. They said that they would pay for our plane fair to Nebraska and back. My sister had to attend summer school so we made plans for me to go by myself.

But before I had the chance to leave for Nebraska, my mom called my grandma in Washington and told her that they wanted to pick all of us kids up in Colorado at the end of the summer. I began crying and told my grandma that I didn’t want to go back. And that I didn’t want to live with my mom anymore. After pressing me for several minutes on why I didn’t want to live with my mom, I finally told her how my step-father had sexually molested me.

About the same time, my brother was suspended from school for drawing sexual pictures and intimidating other students and inappropriately touching them. It was also discovered that he was accessing pornographic web sites. Because of the nature of my brother’s suspension, the school set up family counseling for us. That’s when I told them what my step-father had done. The school contacted law enforcements and the police began an investigation that covered all the states where we had lived.

I have never seen my grandma so angry. She called my grandparents in Nebraska and told them what had happened. They had already booked me a round trip flight to Nebraska and said that I would never have to live with my step-father again.

That summer was the best summer ever. On Sunday I had a 9 AM flight to Nebraska. Even though I was excited about going to Nebraska, that morning was a pain because I had to get up at 6 AM and rush to pack everything. By the time I was ready it was already 8:15. Finally we were on our way to the airport. By the time we got there it was about 8:40. Then I had to pose for pictures and give everyone a hug before I left.

Miraculously, I made it to my plane on time. My first stop was Salt Lake City, Utah where I had to change planes. I finally arrived in Nebraska at 4 PM. It had been three years since I last saw my grandparents. I gave both of them a big hug when I saw them. After we got my luggage, we went to Applebee’s for dinner. We had a great talk and caught up on things. After that, we went to their house where to my surprise, they already had a bedroom set up for me. Then I checked the house out and hung out for a while and for the first time in a long time, I was able to sleep soundly in my own bed.

After a few days I hung out with a couple of old friends of mine that I’ve known since elementary school. We all had a blast catching up again after three years. It helped me not to think about those years of abuse I had lived through.

Then grandpa surprised me by contacting my biological dad who lived in the same city and arranged for us to meet! I never had the chance to meet my real dad because my mom always kept me from him. Seeing him for the first time gave me butterflies. I was so nervous that I felt like I was going to puke. But I was also really excited at the same time.

When I first saw my dad I gave him a big hug. Then we started talking and getting to know each other. I could tell that he was just as nervous as I was. But I was surprised at how easy he was to talk to. He made me feel so comfortable that it was like we knew each other for years. After our long talk he asked if I wanted to meet everyone in his family at a cook out that was planned. Of course I said yes. So the next day he introduced me to another little brother of mine, his wife, aunts, uncles and more grandparents. We all had a great time, laughing, and having fun. Almost immediately I felt close to my biological dad and my new little brother and stepmom. That was one of the best days of my life.

Unfortunately, things were about to turn really ugly. When my mom found out that I had spoken out about the sexual abuse she called my grandpa and threatened to take me from them by force, have him arrested and make sure that he never saw me again.

For weeks my mom and several of my step-father’s family members would call and harass me and my grandparents, trying to get me to recant my allegations against my step-father. My grandparents finally bought me a new phone and screened phone calls on our home phone.

They also hired an attorney and were able to become my legal guardians. They also got me into professional counseling with a therapist who testified that I suffered from PTSD due to years of physical, emotional and sexual abuse and chronic neglect at the hands of my step-father.

When I first came to live with my grandparents in Nebraska I was failing all of my classes in school and I struggled with anger, depression and nightmares. But because of my grandparents love and support and the support of many of my friends, I am no longer a victim. I am a survivor. I am now a senior in high school and I have several offers from some of the best colleges in the country. I now live with my biological dad and my relationship with my mom is slowly getting better. I am looking forward to the future.

Epilogue

In February of 2015, Shelby’s step-father was convicted of sexual assault of a child in Sarpy County, Ne. for sexually molesting his then 11 year old step-daughter. (A third degree Felony) But he was allowed to plead guilty to a lesser charge of misdemeanor sexual assault. The judge sentenced him to only two years probation!

Ten days after Shelby’s step-father was released on probation he was arrested again on suspicion of child abuse—after throwing his 8 year old biological daughter across a room and into a wall. The remaining children were removed from the home and placed in foster care.

Shelby’s step-father never received jail-time for the child abuse against his biological daughter, but was sentenced to 180 days in jail for probation violations after being found with weapons, drug paraphernalia, pornographic material and use of alcohol and K-2 Synthetic Marijuana while on probation. He was released from jail after only serving 3 months and was allowed to move to a small town in Colorado where he was to register as a sex offender at the Sheriff’s Office there within 72 hours. He failed to register for more than two weeks. He is now free to possibly abuse other children.

Unfortunately, cases like this play out far too often.

Jesus said, “Whoever receives one such child in my name receives me, but whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin, it would be better for him to have a great millstone fastened around his neck and to be drowned in the depth of the sea.” (Matthew 18:5-6) And yet most people are silent about the thousands of children throughout America who suffer from child sexual abuse and neglect each day. This not only has harmful consequences on the physical and emotional development and well-being of children, it can also carry over into their adulthood. Victims may exhibit regressive behaviors, sleep disturbances, eating disorders and may also become more susceptible to drug or alcohol abuse.

A flawed system

Many people believe that the Sex Offender Registry law (SOR) keeps a sex offender away from schools, playgrounds or places where children play. This is a common misperception.The SOR law in many states does not have the legal jurisdiction to prevent an offender from attending events, limiting employment, or restricting an offender from entering any facilities, or refrain from living with or socializing with children. The SOR law can only mandate that the offender register his or her required information at the sheriff’s office within the required time.

Approximately 60% of boys and 80% of girls who are sexually victimized are abused by someone known to the child or the child’s family. Relatives, step-parents, friends, persons in positions of authority over the child, or persons who supervise children are more likely than strangers to commit a sexual assault. And most convicted sex offenders are eventually released to the community under probation or parole supervision.

The police do their job and arrest these criminals, but then the prosecutors and judges allow them to plead to a lesser charge and hand down light sentences or probation that allows them to re-offend, placing the public at risk.

Many times there is more severe punishment for someone who abuses animals than for someone who abuses children. It is time we stand up for the victims of childhood sexual abuse. Because, “We who are strong have an obligation to bear with the failings of the weak, and not to just please ourselves.” (Romans 15:1)

What can we do?

Since this is an election year, this is a great time to write to your senators and legislators in your state and tell them to make sure that victims of sexual abuse receive justice from the courts. We can also send a strong message in November by voting “NO” to retain lenient judges.

There are also many helpful resources online:

https://www.rainn.org/articles/how-can-i-protect-my-child-sexual-assault

http://www.pandys.org/articles/protectyourchild.html

http://www.d2l.org/site/c.4dICIJOkGcISE/b.6035035/k.8258/Prevent_Child_Sexual_Abuse.htm#.V_ZbaDKZPVo

https://1in6.org/men/get-information/online-readings/others-who-were-involved-or-not/why-do-adults-fail-to-protect-children-from-sexual-abuse-or-exploitation/

If you’ve been sexually abused, you may feel broken and undeserving of love. You might respond to your abuse with anxiety, depression, self-loathing, self-harming actions, eating disorders, or addictions. But Satan doesn’t care how you react to the sexual abuse . . . as long as you don’t turn to Jesus. Because the enemy knows that when we find our identity, security, and dignity in Christ, we can live in victory.

Jesus, doesn’t see a broken person, he sees perfection—a beautiful person on the way to being healed.

“Acquitting the guilty and condemning the innocent—both are detestable to the LORD.” (Proverbs 17:15 NLT)

Congressman Major R. Owens at the opening of a field hearing on child sexual abuse in New York on April 20, 1992, stated “Ignoring or mistreating child sexual abuse is tantamount to allowing an untreated cancer to grow in our society.” (http://justiceforchildren.org/about-us/system-is-failing-our-children/)

At that hearing, experts and parents testified concerning the obstacles to addressing and remedying this problem. David Paterson, a state senator from New York, testified that one of every three young girls and one of every five boys become the victims of child sexual abuse and that a high percentage of those most afflicted repeat the cycle.

This federal hearing was convened in response to a state-level investigation conducted by then-Assemblyman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), who concluded that the system has failed miserably to protect sexually abused children. Unfortunately, over 24 years have passed since those hearings, yet, reports of child abuse and neglect nationwide continue to rise.

This increase is the direct result of the failure of our legal system to protect known victims of abuse. This crisis is even more critical as it affects children who are unable to fight for themselves. According to a 2003 National Institute of Justice report, 3 out of 4 adolescents who have been sexually assaulted were victimized by someone they knew well. (page 5)

The courts and the victims

Unfortunately, there are no national statistics on the number of prosecutions for child sexual abuse. It is clear, however, that thousands of criminal cases are filed each year.

In many cases, the strength of the evidence depends on the child’s ability to testify. Children are usually the only eyewitnesses to sexual abuse, and prosecutors are more likely to file criminal charges when they believe children will be effective witnesses. Not surprisingly, age plays a role in prosecutorial decision making. Preschool-age children are sometimes ineffective witnesses, with the tragic consequence that the law is least able to protect the youngest and most vulnerable victims.

Plea Bargaining

Once criminal charges are filed, prosecutors engage in plea bargaining with defense attorneys representing defendants. In many cases, the defendant pleads guilty to a less serious offense than originally charged, or agrees to plead guilty to the original charge in exchange for the prosecutor’s commitment to recommend leniency when the judge pronounces sentence. Approximately 66% of all child sexual abuse charges end in guilty pleas to lesser charges before trial. (http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/ascii/fpcseo06.txt)

Diversion from Prosecution

In some jurisdictions, prosecutors have authority to divert selected defendants away from prosecution for child sexual abuse and into treatment. Criminal proceedings are suspended on the condition of specified obligations by the defendant, often including participation in counseling or treatment. Upon successful completion or compliance with the conditions of diversion, the case is dismissed.

Sentencing and conviction

Although most cases that go to trial end in conviction, as a result of plea bargaining, diversion, and dismissal for other reasons, the number of sex abuse cases that go all the way to trial is very small. Only 10% of all cases filed by prosecutors are ever tried.

Many believe that convicted child molesters often receive long prison terms. However,  many individuals convicted of child sexual abuse do not go to prison. Instead, their punishment consists of a suspended prison sentence and/or probation. The average length of probation for felony convictions is two to three years.

Sex Offender Registration Laws

In large part because of the fear and belief that sex offenders will reoffend, many states require convicted sex offenders to register with local law enforcement agencies and to change their registration when they move. In several cases, sex offenders have successfully challenged the constitutionality of registration laws, arguing that such laws constitute cruel and unusual punishment.

The Sex Offender Registration law (SOR) does not have any restrictions on registered sex offenders. This is a common misperception. The only restrictions placed on a convicted sex offender are done so by the judge as part of the conditions of probation. In most states the SOR does not have the legal jurisdiction to prevent an offender from attending events, limiting employment, restrict an offender from entering any facilities, or refrain from living with or socializing with children or vulnerable persons. The SOR law can only mandate the offender to register his or her required information within the required time. This means that a convicted sex offender has the freedom to frequent, and even work, at or near schools, parks, museums, public pools and day care facilities, unless prohibited by the conditions of their probation!

What Can We Do?

“An urgent need exists for federal action to ensure that laws in our states pertaining to child abuse and neglect, whether physical or sexual, whether family member or stranger, are strengthened to protect children. By aggressively intervening on a timely basis on behalf of the child, and by ensuring that the legal rights of the child are observed in any subsequent judicial proceeding, our government can stop both the actual and systemic abuse of the child.” —Randy Burton, founder and president of the child advocacy organization Justice for Children http://justiceforchildren.org

Thousands of children throughout America suffer sexual abuse each day at the hands of the very people who are supposed to protect and care for them. This has harmful consequences on the physical and emotional development and well-being of children. The police do their job and arrest these criminals, but our laws allow judges to hand down light sentences or probation that allows the perpetrators to re-offend, placing the public at risk. In several states a judge must run for retention in office in the first general election that occurs more than three years after his or her appointment, and every six years thereafter. We can send a strong message in November by voting “NO” to retain these judges.

“See that you do not despise one of these little ones. For I tell you that in heaven their angels always see the face of my Father who is in heaven.” (Matthew 18:10)

There is  a storm coming. And not many are prepared. Not a physical storm like what we’ve seen lately with rain and hail and tornados and floods; but a spiritual storm. One that will be more devastating than any tornado or flood.

The people of Judah had rebelled against the principles upon which their nation had been founded on. Judah had turned its back upon God and rejected any attempt by those sent to call her back. As promised, God withdrew His protection from her. He had warned that if His people became faithless that He would employ a pagan power to conquer them and lead them back into captivity. He had led them from Egyptian bondage 800 years before, and now, because of their infidelity, He would allow them to return to bondage—this time in Babylon.

They had refused to believe it could ever happen to them. They found their own false prophets to tell them that everything was fine. They ridiculed Jeremiah and others who warned of the devastation to come. The Lord spoke through Jeremiah and put it this way; “Behold, I will send and take all the families of the north…and I will send Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon…against this land and against its inhabitants…and this whole land shall be a desolation and a horror, and these nations shall serve the king of Babylon seventy years.” (Jeremiah 25:9-11)

But the false prophets told them that God would never allow this to happen because they were God’s chosen people. They were insisting that God loved them and that He only wanted to bless them. But it wasn’t true!

Today we have the modern counterparts of these false prophets. Some promise that God will bless you if you send them money. Some say that God will not bring judgment against Christians because they are God’s chosen people. They say that God loves them and that He only wants to bless them. They claim that the world’s problems are a direct result of sinfulness in the “world”—But if we elect someone with “Christian values”,  America will be great again.

They have forgotten that God is the one who exalts leaders into office: (Psalm 75:7; Daniel 2:21) So what if, because we have turned our back on God and instead placed our trust in man and rejected any attempt by those He sent to call us back, God also removes His protection from us?

There are many today who cry out, “God bless America!” But how can God bless America when we allow children to be beaten, raped and killed? How can God bless America when we refuse to allow our children to pray and criminalize those who do? How can God bless America when we ignore the suffering of the poor and destitute while we indulge ourselves on the luxuries we have accumulated for ourselves.

William Booth embarked upon his ministerial career in 1852, desiring to win the lost multitudes of England to Christ. He walked the streets of London to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ to the poor, the homeless, the hungry, and the destitute. Booth abandoned the conventional concept of a church and a pulpit, instead taking his message to the people.

He once related a vision he had concerning the lost. He saw a dark and stormy ocean. In that ocean he saw myriads of poor human beings plunging and floating, shouting and shrieking, cursing and struggling and drowning. But what puzzled him most was the fact that although all of them had been rescued at one time or another from the ocean, nearly everyone no longer seemed troubled by those who were downing—nor did they even seem to care about the poor perishing ones who were struggling and drowning right before their very eyes—many of whom were their own husbands and wives, brothers and sisters and even their own children!

The primary aim of the Salvation Army was not to provide charity, but to win souls from the devil. Booth stated that “what was important was not whether a man died in the poorhouse but if his soul was saved.” (‘The Salvationist in a Secular Society’— p29)

And yet today the Salvation Army is a human organization more interested in the needs of the flesh, rather than the needs of the soul. Is it possible that God had given William Booth a vision of the “future” Salvation Army and Christianity as a whole?

The Church today reminds me of a poem I read years ago written by Howard Clinebell:

The Little Lifesaving Station

On a dangerous seacoast where shipwrecks often occurred, there was once a crude lifesaving station. The building wasn’t much more than a small hut, and there was only one boat. But the few devoted members kept a constant watch over the sea, and with no thought of themselves, went out night and day tirelessly searching for the lost.

Many lives were saved by this wonderful little station. So much so that it became famous for its rescue efforts. Some of those who were saved and various others in the surrounding area wanted to become associated with the station and give of their time and money for the support of its work. New boats were purchased and donated to the station and crews were trained to improve the rescue operations of the station.

As the little lifesaving station grew some of the members were unhappy that the building itself was so crude and poorly equipped. They felt that a more comfortable place should be provided for those who were rescued from the sea. So the members raised funds for the station and replaced the emergency cots with beds and placed better furniture in an enlarged building.

Soon the lifesaving station became a popular gathering place for its members. They decorated it beautifully and furnished it so exquisitely that it became sort of a club. The lifesaving station’s logo still prevailed on the wall above the fireplace and its name was still used to raise funds,  but  fewer members were now interested in going out to sea on lifesaving missions. They even hired lifeboat crews to do the work that they used to do themselves.

About this time a large ship was wrecked off the coast and the hired crews brought in boatloads of cold, wet, and half drowned people. These people were dirty and sick. And some of them were foreigners who couldn’t speak English. The beautiful club was thrown into chaos. The property committee immediately had a shower built outside the club building with an attached closet filled with clean clothes so that the victims of shipwrecks could be cleaned up and dressed properly before coming inside.

At the next club meeting there was a split in the membership. Most of the members wanted to stop the club’s lifesaving activities because it was unpleasant and a hindrance to the normal social structure of the club. Some members insisted that the lifesaving operations were the primary reason for them being there and pointed out that they were still called a lifesaving station. The latter were finally voted down and were told that if they wanted to save the lives of all the various kinds of people who were shipwrecked in those waters they could start their own lifesaving station further down the coast. That’s exactly what they did.

As the years went by, the new station experienced the same changes that had occurred in the old one. It evolved into a club and later another lifesaving station was founded.

History continues to repeat itself and if you visit that seacoast today you will find a number of exclusive clubs along its shores.  Shipwrecks are frequent in those waters, but sadly, most of the people there drown.

“But understand this, that in the last days there will come times of difficulty. For people will be lovers of self, lovers of money, proud, arrogant, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, heartless, unappeasable, slanderous, without self-control, brutal, not loving good, treacherous, reckless, swollen with conceit, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, having the appearance of godliness, but denying its power. Avoid such people. For among them are those who creep into households and capture weak women, burdened with sins and led astray by various passions, always learning and never able to arrive at a knowledge of the truth…But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have firmly believed, knowing from whom you learned it and how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings, which are able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus.” (2 Timothy 3:1-7, 14-15)

“But whoso shall offend one of these little ones which believe in me, it were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and that he were drowned in the depth of the sea.” (Matthew 18:6 KJV)

Child abuse can take a number of forms—physical, verbal, emotional, psychological, sexual, etc. But any form of abuse is opposed to the ruling principle of God’s kingdom—unselfish love.

An abusive person does not know love and does not know God. “Beloved, let us love one another, for love is of God; and everyone who loves is born of God and knows God. He who does not love does not know God, for God is love.” (1 John 4:7, 8)

Biblical doctrines are designed to support the caring of the most vulnerable among us—children. Sadly, however, it’s not uncommon for adults to justify child abuse and neglect with religious church doctrines.

Many of these believers are fond of quoting Scriptures to justify their abuse—particularly the verse in Proverbs 13:24 that says, “He who spares the rod hates his son, but he who loves him is careful to discipline him.” But in Hebrew, the word translated as “rod” is the same word used in Psalms 23:4, “thy rod and thy staff, they comfort me.” The shepherd’s rod was used to guide the sheep, not to beat them with it.

So what the writer of Proverbs was actually saying was, “He who refuses to GUIDE his children, hates them.” The point of discipline is to transmit values to children. The purpose of punishment is to coerce compliance, to control and to exact revenge. To inflict pain as a form of revenge, is something that the Bible says belongs to God alone.

There are only a few places that “rod” is possibly referring to a literal rod in connection with hitting someone. First let us look at Exodus 21:20: “And if a man smite his servant, or his maid, with a rod, and he die under his hand; he shall be surely punished.

This Scripture in Exodus says that if this rod were used on a maid or servant and killed them that it was punishable. So, one can see that it had to be a heavy duty instrument capable of killing someone which would be consistent with the idea of a staff or club. If it is ok to spank a child using this instrument, then it is not mentioned here and if it were, then the child could die by its use.

2014 Children’s Advocacy Center Statistics Highlights 

Among the over 315,000 children served by Children’s Advocacy Centers around the country in 2014, some startling statistics include:

• 116,940 children were ages 0 to 6 years

• 115,959 children were ages 7 to 12 years

• 81,025 children were ages 13 to 18 years

• 205,438 children reported sexual abuse

• 60,897 children reported physical abuse

• 211,831 children participated in on-site forensic interviewing

http://www.nationalchildrensalliance.org/sites/default/files/download-files/2014NationalAnnual_0.pdf

If these statistics represented a contagious disease like Ebola, the CDC would declare it an epidemic! And yet very little is being done to protect children who suffer from child abuse.

Why do people struggle to report child abuse?

The apostle Paul wrote in Romans 13:4: “For the one in authority is God’s servant for your good.” This clearly indicates that the central purpose of a civil government is to do good. If that is the case, can there be any greater good carried out by a civil government than to punish those who violate laws designed to protect society’s most vulnerable members?

All 50 states have laws that mandate its citizens to report suspected neglect or abuse of children. Violation of these laws not only fails to protect children, but also enables the perpetrator to avoid criminal prosecution and encourages them to continue abusing children.

Besides biblical and legal grounds for reporting suspected abuse to authorities, there are also practical reasons to do so. The government has the authority to remove children from parents or guardians who are inflicting physical harm to children. However, this can’t happen if the authorities are not notified of the suspected maltreatment.

Oftentimes, a child’s very survival is dependent upon whether we take the initiative and report it. There should be little debate within the Christian community that the protection and survival of children is a God ordained responsibility that we cannot neglect or excuse.

Why do some churches and Christian organizations seem to struggle with reporting the suspected abuse of a child? It is the fear or unwillingness to get involved, or fear of angering the family. Some believe that someone else will speak up and do something.

But at the heart of the struggle is a fear that is rooted in the need to self-protect. It is a fear of losing the good reputation of a ministry, or the fear of losing ministry donors, or the fear of losing respect from congregation members, (What will they think of me if I’m wrong?) or the fear of losing a ministry altogether.

All of these fears have nothing to do with the ministry or Jesus. It is all about protecting self. The Gospel tells Christians that our identity is in Christ alone, and that our reputation and all that we possess belongs to him.

From God’s perspective, this liberates us to sacrifice personal and institutional reputations if doing so protects and preserves the lives of His little ones. Isn’t that what Jesus did for us? He sacrificed his reputation, his supporters, his ministry, and even his very own life in order to protect and redeem us. This should drive us to do the same regardless of the consequences to our church, our ministry, or our reputation, in order to protect children.

The next time someone tells you that reporting suspected abuse of children may  lead to more personal hurt and damage your reputation, tell them that our reputation is only damaged when we turn away and leave grievous sins alone in the darkness of silence.

If you suspect that a child is a victim of abuse or neglect you should report your concerns to your local child protective services agency. (CPS) Even if you are unsure of whether the child’s situation has already been reported to  CPS. Refer to What Should I Know about Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect?

Find other helpful links at: http://www.childrensadvocacycenter.org/links.cfm

 

Many were shocked to discover through some recently released undercover videos that Planned Parenthood may be involved in harvesting fetal body parts for profit. This has led to an outrage among abortion opponents and congress considering defunding Planned Parenthood.

This should be no surprise to those who are familiar with Scripture. For the Bible teaches us that Satan is “the ruler of this world “. (John 12:31; 14:30; 16:11; 2 Corinthians 4:4) He is the thief that comes only to steal and kill and destroy. (John 10:10) And those who follow him will do the same.

Cecile Richards, the president of Planned Parenthood, made the following statement on a video she made defending its practice of harvesting fetal body parts. *Note that Planned Parenthood has denied selling fetal body parts for a profit, which is against federal law, but they DO admit to harvesting those fetal body parts for scientific research.

“In health care, patients sometimes want to donate tissue to scientific research that can help lead to medical breakthroughs, such as treatments and cures for serious diseases. Women at Planned Parenthood who have abortions are no different.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZUjU4e4fUI  (Notice that she refers to unborn babies as “tissue”)

But is that how God views the unborn—As nothing more than “tissue”? 

“For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well. My frame was not hidden from you, when I was being made in secret, intricately woven in the depths of the earth. Your eyes saw my unformed substance; in your book were written, every one of them, the days that were formed for me, when as yet there was none of them.” (Psalm 139: 13-16 )

Who was in the womb? David! A literal and living person. The Bible never uses anything less than human terms to describe the unborn.

But the Bible isn’t alone in declaring this truth. Science also declares that an unborn child is just as much an independent human being as you. Most organs in the embryo begin to form at about 3 weeks after fertilization. Shortly thereafter, the area that will become the brain and spinal cord begins to develop. The heart and major blood vessels begin to develop earlier—by about day 16. The heart begins to pump fluid through blood vessels by day 20, and the first red blood cells appear the next day. Blood vessels continue to develop in the embryo and placenta. Almost all organs are completely formed by about 10 weeks after fertilization. At twelve weeks, the child will often struggle for life two or three hours when removed from the mother. http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/women-s-health-issues/normal-pregnancy/stages-of-development-of-the-fetus

There have been over 50 million abortions performed since 1973, the year the Supreme Court issued the Roe v. Wade decision ushering in legal abortion nationwide. With all of the unrest and disfunction in America today, I find it hard to believe that not one of those 50 million babies would not have grown up to be someone who would lead this country back to its original greatness.

Today, Jesus could say, “America, America, you who kill the prophets and leaders sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, but you were not willing.” (From Matthew 23:37)

Nazi Ethics and Planned Parenthood

The doctors during the Nazi regime, like Planned Parenthood, also felt that they were doing wonderful work for humanity. This raises a critical issue. The doctors in Nazi Germany took the Hippocratic Oath, yet they knowingly violated the Hippocratic principle of “do no harm”.

How were they able to reconcile this glaring contradiction? To begin to address this contradiction, an examination must be made of some of the moral premises utilized. In Nazi Germany, Jews, Gypsies, the mentally and/or physically challenged and others were methodically excluded from society through a series of laws known as the Nuremberg Laws; thus making them non-persons.

These racial policies had a strong grounding in genetics and evolutionary biology. One need only look at some of the many written explanations by the Nazi government to prevent offspring with hereditary illnesses:“In the case of plants and animals cultivated by humans, care is taken to weed out the less valuable. Only the useful and valuable genetic material is preserved. That is also what nature wants through the law of selection. Should not we do the same with people? Or shall the lines of our people with hereditary illnesses overcome the healthy? That would mean the self-dissolution and destruction of the whole people, for a people that suffers from hereditary illnesses is not able to maintain itself in the great battle of selection between the peoples! http://www.qcc.cuny.edu/socialsciences/ppecorino/MEDICAL_ETHICS_TEXT/Chapter_7_Human_Experimentation/Reading-Nazi-experimentation.htm

In line with this thinking, prisoners were not viewed as human individuals, but rather as “living cultures” to be used with no consideration for their wellbeing. (Sound familiar?) 

We may not all be as cruel as the Nazis, but do we view certain human beings as less human than us?

While there is no argument that Hitler abhorred the Jews and caused almost six million to be ruthlessly killed, Eleven million precious human lives were lost during the Holocaust. Five million of these were non-Jewish. Who were they? Whose children, whose mothers and fathers were they? Jehovah Witnesses, Gypsies, homosexuals, Blacks, and Catholic priests were among the forgotten five million. But how could five million human beings have been killed and forgotten?

Worse yet, is that in the post-war years, many of these survivors were never recognized as victims of the Holocaust during their lives and never lived to be repatriated, as many of the Jewish survivors and their families were.

Pro-Life or Anti-Abortion?

There are many now who claim that they are pro-life and stand in front of Planned Parenthood and abortion clinics proudly holding up their signs announcing their disgust of abortion. But are they really pro-life, or just anti-abortion?

Many of the so-called pro-life groups do little or nothing to help young girls deal with their life changing decision after they have talked them out of getting abortions. Many of these young girls who keep their babies later find out that they are unprepared to raise a child on their own. With little education, no job prospects and no understanding of raising a child, many of these poor girls end up raising their child in high poverty, high crime neighborhoods. Statistics show that in this environment, neglecting and abusing their child becomes a real possibility. http://www.nber.org/digest/jan00/w7343.html

Sadly, many of these mothers (and children) are forgotten by those who worked so hard to prevent them from having an abortion.

Fortunately, there are organizations who are truly pro-life who not only help young pregnant girls make wise decisions concerning their unborn babies, but they also advise them on the options of adoption—and if they decide to keep the baby, they counsel them on parenting, help them to get an education, find work,  housing, daycare  and supply them with essentials like baby clothes, bottles, cribs, etc. But those organizations are few and far between.

Abortion is wrong because reduces human life to nothing more than tissue. And harvesting body parts from an unborn murder victim, regardless of the reason, is akin to child sacrifice—innocents who are sacrificed on the altar of choice to be sold to the highest bidder.

But the Bible is also clear on what we as Christians should do when it comes to helping these vulnerable young mothers:

So then, as we have opportunity, let us do good to everyone, and especially to those who are of the household of faith. (Gal. 6:10)

What good is it, my brothers, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can that faith save him? If a brother or sister is poorly clothed and lacking in daily food, and one of you says to them, “Go in peace, be warmed and filled,” without giving them the things needed for the body, what good is that? So also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead. (James 2:14-17)

Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others. (Phil. 2:4)

“We are confronted today with the essential question of what it means to be human,” Charmaine Yoest, president of Americans United for Life says. “How we answer affects us all. This is a moral flashpoint for our country that will define our generation.”

Being pro-life is more than just preventing abortions.

If you are pregnant and don’t know what to do, get help at:

http://www.lifecall.org/cpc.html

If you have had an abortion, know that there is still forgiveness through Jesus.

‘The Week’ website recently published an article by Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry entitled, “How Christianity Invented Children”. http://www.theweek.com/articles/551027/how-christianity-invented-children

Gobry claims that one of the notorious practices in the ancient world was the sexual exploitation of children and points to paganism as the original perpetrator of the sexual exploitation of children. He goes on to say that “Christianity’s invention of the cultural idea of children as treasured human beings was really an outgrowth of its most stupendous and revolutionary idea: the radical equality, and the infinite value, of every single human being as a beloved child of God.”

But if that is true, then it seems that we have reverted back to the culture of ancient Rome.

1 in 4 girls and 1 in 6 boys are now sexually abused before age of 18. Child sexual abuse is a prevalent issue in the United States even within the confines of our schools and churches—The very places where our children should be the safest!

Nonetheless, there’s one form that is especially revolting and shocking—The act of sexually molesting a child by a family member. And it often occurs to children in a blended family. Statistics show that a child is 33% more likely to be sexually abused in homes where their biological parent is living with, or married to someone other than the child’s biological parent.

When a child is molested by a family member, denial is a natural response since no one likes to think about a family member abusing their own children this way, but worse yet, is when the child victim is accused of making it up and is pressured into recanting the abuse.

It’s important to remember that although the abuse was done by a close family member, it does not erase criminal liability. In fact, this type of molestation should carry the greatest punishment among all forms of child abuse. If this happens to your child, do not hesitate to call the police, because when a molester is tolerated, it’s guaranteed that he or she will do it again. And you could be charged with child neglect and/or child endangerment.

It is also important to remember the damage this causes to a child’s life and soul. Many victims become depressed, have feelings of guilt, shame and distrust, and may cause them to fall into all kinds of risky behavior. Especially as long as lenient judges continue to pass down soft sentences on perpetrators of these types child sex offenders.

Remember what Jesus said in Matthew 18:6 “If anyone causes one of these little ones—those who believe in me—to stumble, it would be better for them to have a large millstone hung around their neck and to be drowned in the depths of the sea.”

Although it is important to address the issue of forgiveness when the abuser is caught and confesses and then asks for forgiveness, this can be difficult for not only the victim but also for other family members.

Certainly we should forgive; However, it is important to remember that molesting and sexually abusing children is a type of sin that, even after repentance and forgiveness, there has to be accountability and justice to ensure the safety of all children that the abuser could come into contact with.

If someone shoots one of your children you must forgive them—but it doesn’t mean that you invite them back into your home so they can shoot the other ones.

How can you protect your children?

Watch your kids – Keep a watchful eye on your children. Kids get distracted and often don’t think about something that’s happened to them while at play. Know what to look for.

  • Changes in behavior, extreme mood swings, withdrawal, or fearfulness
  • Bed-wetting, nightmares, fear of going to bed, or other sleep disturbances
  • Acting out inappropriate sexual behavior
  • Changes in toilet-training habits
  • A fear of certain places, people, or activities
  • Bruises, rashes, or poorly explained injuries
  • Pain, itching, bleeding, fluid, or rawness in the private areas

Talk to your kids- Parents are one of the single most effective tools in the fight against child sexual abuse. Set time aside to sit down and have a discussion. This may be an uncomfortable subject, but remember, you aren’t talking about sex, you’re talking about personal safety. You can use other safety issues as a ‘lead in’ to this topic.

Listen to your kids- Even very young children need to be able to tell you their feelings, thoughts and fears. Make sure that you take the time to listen to your children and assure them that you’re there to protect them.

Teach your kids- Teach them about “good touch, bad touch” and make sure your children know to tell you if something does happen, or even if someone just makes them feel uncomfortable. Teach them to trust their own feelings and instincts. Tell them it’s okay to say “no” and to be rude to anyone in order to protect themselves. Teach them that keeping secrets is not only wrong, but dangerous. If you don’t teach these things to your children, then you are leaving them open for the predator to continue molesting your child unrestrained.

Let your child know they can trust you- It is difficult for a child to come forward with accusations of sexual abuse. So the worst thing you can do to a child who has been sexually abused is to question them or doubt that what they experienced really happened. They need to know that you believe them and that you will protect them from further abuse. They came to you because they trusted you. If that trust is broken because you refused to believe them, chances are slim that they will report future abuses that may go on for years.

While physical abuse might be the most visible, child sexual abuse leaves deep, lasting invisible scars that can carry over into adulthood. There are signs you can look out for that a child is being sexually abused:

  • Excessively withdrawn, fearful, or anxious.
  • Shies away from touch, flinches at sudden movements, or seems afraid to go home.
  • Trouble walking or sitting.
  • Displays knowledge or interest in sexual acts inappropriate to his or her age.

Many people are reluctant to get involved in other families’ lives, but by learning some of these common warning signs of sexual child abuse, you can catch the problem as early as possible and get both the child and the abuser the help that they need.

Of course, just because you see a warning sign doesn’t automatically mean a child is being abused. It’s important to dig deeper, looking for a pattern of abusive behavior. But if you do notice a pattern, report it.

For more information visit: http://www.helpguide.org/articles/abuse/child-abuse-and-neglect.htm