Posts Tagged ‘Pedophiles’

In February 2015, Casey Cline was convicted in Sarpy County, Nebraska of sexually assaulting of his then 11 year old step-daughter. (Case # 13-411- A third degree Felony) http://www.icrimewatch.net/offenderdetails.php?OfndrID=2377330&AgencyID=55290

Even though a great many pages of documents were submitted to Sarpy County Judge Zastera proving that Cline had been physically and emotionally abusive for more than 10 years before he was arrested, Judge Zastera allowed Cline to plead guilty to a lesser charge of misdemeanor sexual assault and only sentenced him to two years probation and required him to register as a sex offender.

Only ten days after Cline was released on probation he was arrested again in Plattsmouth, Nebraska after throwing his 8 year old biological daughter across a room and into a wall. Cline was only charged with violation of probation after police discovered he was in possession of weapons, alcohol, pornography and illegal drugs.  His children were removed from the home and placed in foster care. Cline was never charged with child abuse in that case.

At Cline’s hearing on charges of probation violation Judge John Steinheider of Plattsmouth released Cline on a signature bond and also allowed him to have contact with his children while they were in foster care!

At his sentencing, Cline’s pre-sentencing report (PSR) stated that Cline was also charged with child abuse in two different states. In spite of the fact that the PSR revealed that Cline had a 15 year history of abusive behavior, his public defender still recommended that Cline be given probation again and have contact with his children claiming that the children were in no danger!

Fortunately, this time the judge did not agree with the public defender and sentenced Cline to 180 days in the Cass County jail.

After serving only 3 months in Cass County jail in Plattsmouth, Nebraska, Cline was allowed to move to Colorado. Although he was required to register as a sex offender at his new address in Colorado, he refused to do so for several weeks. He was finally forced to register as a sex offender in Colorado, but only after I continued to call the sheriff’s office about him. Since then he has moved at least twice and as of July 2017 no one knows his current address. He could be anywhere from Colorado to Florida.

Cline has a Face Book page and is a member of several porn groups there. I have reported him to Face Book three times now, but even though Face Book has a policy of banning sex offenders from using Face Book, nothing has been done. Many of your children use Face Book. Cline’s next victim may be your child. You can prevent this by sharing this article on your social media sites.

Casey Cline has proven many times that he does not feel that laws apply to him. Let’s make him famous so that he doesn’t get the chance to harm another child.

Other pictures of Casey Cline:

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Many people have been led to believe that the Sex Offender Registration laws of their state protects children from pedophiles that may be living near their home or their children’s school. This is a common misperception. The SOR law in many states does not have the legal jurisdiction to prevent an offender from attending events, limiting employment, restrict an offender from entering any facilities, or refrain from living with or socializing with children or vulnerable persons. The SOR law can only mandate the offender to register his or her required information at the sheriff’s office within the required time.

In other words, a registered sex offender is able to legally visit and work at schools, playgrounds, children’s museums, daycare centers and other places where vulnerable children may congregate.

First we have to distinguish between the types of sex offenders. All rapists, whether they are violent or not, are criminals. There are also sex offenders (public exposure, unwanted sexual advances) who, while they committed a crime, are not rapists and who are not violent. But when we are talking about keeping children safe, many parents are concerned about pedophiles. But not all sex offenders are pedophiles. So lumping all sex offenders together does not really add any marginal value to keeping our children safe. The person who got drunk and raped a woman is a criminal, but not a pedophile.

Politicians want you to think that registries are effective because politicians have put a lot of political capital and attention into registries. They want you to think that placing sex offenders on the registry is proof that they are keeping your child safe. But simply focusing on the registry, they neglect to focus on that the real threat to a child. The problem is that the politicians aren’t advocating evidence-based approaches, and aren’t focusing on the fact that more than 90 percent of people who commit child sexual abuse is well known to the victim. The majority of the time that child sex abuse is reported, it is committed by someone who is a trusted family member. On top of that, the majority of children never report sexual abuse when it’s happening. They’re often afraid of their parents’ reactions or fear getting into trouble. They also might believe the abuser when they tell them that something bad would happen if they tell.

We always hear about the sex offender who was on the registry and reoffended, but these high profile cases are reported because they make for good stories for the news media. But such recidivism is not representative of what is going on the majority of the time.

A parent might believe that if they check the local sex offender registry it will help to keep their children safe. The question then is: what else have they done in addition to checking the registry? The people that we need to be worried about the most are not the ones we know are on the sex offender registry.

Children need to be taught safety skills

Parents need to realize that the person most likely to sexually abuse their child is someone they know and trust, and someone who has regular contact with their child. This known and trusted person is likely to violate the trust of the family and child. That is why it is important for a child to have the tools needed to protect themselves from these trusted persons, and to know when to speak up when the trust is violated.

It is not only important for parents to educate their children, but schools need to educate their students too. Because sometimes the abuse is happening at home. And parents and educators need to be properly trained how to identify when a child is being victimized.

I am not advocating that we eliminate sex offender registries. Parents and the public should want to know who has committed sex offenses that may be living near them. And since all criminal records are public information, this information should not be suppressed.

My point is that the sex offender registry is about as effective in stopping child sexual abuse as using a BB gun against a home invader—you might get lucky by using it, but it won’t be a very effective deterrent. The public needs to start to understand that sex offender registries don’t keep people safe the way they think because of the nature of how predators operate when building and then violating trust. That is why the real threat is likely to come from someone known and trusted by the family. The statistics are very clear about this.

Warning Signs

Everyone can take steps to prevent the sexual abuse of children. The web site, stopitnow.org provides prevention tip sheets that can help you take action to keep children and youth safe, whether it’s making a family safety plan, finding a safe school or camp, or safety on the internet.

Signs that a child has been abused:

  • Acting out in an inappropriate sexual way with toys or objects.
  • Nightmares, sleeping problems.
  • Becoming withdrawn or very clingy.
  • Becoming unusually secretive.
  • Sudden unexplained personality changes, mood swings.
  • Regressing to younger behaviors, e.g. bedwetting, thumb sucking.
  • Unaccountable fear of particular places or people.
  • Outburst of anger.
  • Changes in eating habits.
  • Talk of a new, older friend and unexplained money or gifts.
  • Self-harm. (cutting, burning or other harmful activities)
  • Not wanting to be alone with a particular person.

Behaviors to watch for when adults are with children:

  • Makes others uncomfortable by ignoring social or physical boundaries.
  • Refuses to let a child set any of his or her own limits.
  • Insists on hugging, touching, kissing, tickling, wrestling with or holding a child even.
  • when the child does not want this physical contact or attention.
  • Frequently walks in on children/teens in the bathroom.
  • Turns to a child for emotional or physical comfort normally shared with adults.
  • Has secret interactions children.
  • Spends excessive time emailing, text messaging or calling children.
  • Insists on or manages to spend uninterrupted time alone with a child.
  • Frequently babysits children for free; takes children on special outings alone; buys children gifts or gives them money for no apparent reason.

Since the courts, judges and politicians will do little or nothing to protect our children from sexual predators, it is up to adults, parents and teachers to educate ourselves and our children on the dangers of sexual abuse.

You can find more tips at: http://www.stopitnow.org/ohc-content/warning-signs

But Jesus said, “Let the little children come to me and do not hinder them, for to such belongs the kingdom of heaven.” Matthew 19:14

Randy Stonehill and Phil Keaggy recorded a song called “Who Will Save The Children” for Compassion International, a Christian charity dedicated to helping children in poverty. But it could very well be a song for abused children. 

Today the world is facing many problems. High unemployment, poverty, homelessness, illegal immigration, racial unrest, gun violence and threats of terrorism—just to name a few.

And yet one of our most tragic problems that has spread world-wide barely gets a bi-line in the news—sexual child abuse.

There have been plenty of reports about the sex trafficking trade and the efforts that some law enforcement agencies have taken to combat this crime. We will even hear reports on how famous pedophiles like Subway spokesman Jared Fogle, are being arrested and prosecuted for their heinous crimes against children.

But it seems that nothing is being done to stop pedophiles who sexually abuse children in their own homes!  Most victims know and trust their abusers. It isn’t strangers our children have to fear most—It’s those who live in their own home!

Children who live with a single parent that has a live-in partner are 20-30 times more likely to be victims of child sexual abuse than children living with both biological parents. Studies show that 1 in 4 girls and 1 in 6 boys will be sexually abused before the age of 18. That means that there will be 500,000 babies born in the US this year that will be sexually abused (Many in their own homes) before they turn 18, if we do not prevent it!

In it’s most recent study, the CDC estimated the lifetime cost to society for dealing with all issues related to child abuse of just one year’s worth of traumatized kids is $585 billion! An astonishing figure that obviously repeats each year!

One of the reasons that the public is not sufficiently aware of child sexual abuse as a problem is that 73% of child victims do not tell anyone about the abuse for at least a year. 45% of victims do not tell anyone for at least 5 years. And some never disclose their abuse.

Another reason is that many people rely on the court system and law enforcement alone to take steps to protect children from child predators who would do harm to our children.

But the Nebraska Legislature finds that sex offenders present a high risk to commit repeat offenses. They further find that efforts of law enforcement agencies to protect their communities, conduct investigations, and quickly apprehend sex offenders are impaired by the lack of available information about individuals who have pleaded guilty to or have been found guilty of sex offenses and who live, work, or attend school in their jurisdiction. (nebraskalegislature.gov/laws/statutes/ 29-4001.01 – 4003) http://nebraskalegislature.gov/laws/statutes.php?statute=29-4001.01

In spite of this, many judges continue to issue light sentences and probation to child sex offenders. And many people believe that once a sex offender is convicted, he or she is restricted on where they can live and travel.

It may surprise many to know that in many states the only restriction imposed on a convicted pedophile is that he or she register as a sex offender at the sheriff’s office within the required time. (Usually within 72 hours)

That means that someone convicted of sexual child abuse may freely visit schools, public parks, children museums, public swimming pools and beaches—basically anywhere that children frequent.

From the Nebraska Sex Offender Registry website:

ARE THERE ANY RESTRICTIONS REGARDING SEX OFFENDERS?

The Nebraska Sex Offender Registration law does not have any restrictions on registered sex offenders.  This is a common misperception.  The SOR law also does not have the legal jurisdiction to prevent an offender from attending events, limiting employment, restrict an offender from entering any facilities, or refrain from living with or socializing with children or vulnerable persons.  The SOR law can only mandate the offender to register his or her required information under statutes 29-4004 and 29-4006 at the sheriff’s office within the required time.

IS THERE ANY RESTRICTIONS AS TO WHERE A SEX OFFENDER CAN LIVE?

Nebraska legislation simply enacted guidelines in July 2006 for those cities who wish to adopt a living restriction ordinance. It is not a state-wide law. Therefore, it only applies to those cities or designated entities that pass such an ordinance which only applies to schools and day cares; furthermore, it will be up to the local agencies to enforce the restrictions if adopted. The city ordinance only applies to sexual predators that moved to the reported address after July 2006. Sexual predator means an individual who is required to register under the Sex Offender Registration act, who has committed an aggravated offense and who has victimized a person eighteen years of age or younger. The Nebraska State Patrol does not track which cities choose to enact or enforce the ordinance. Please contact the local city office, police department or sheriff’s office of the city in question. https://sor.nebraska.gov/FAQ

I experienced the pain and anguish of this crime personally when my granddaughter was sexually molested by her step-father several years ago. After two years of attending hearing after hearing in court, the judge only sentenced him to two years probation. Less than ten days later he was arrested again on charges of physically abusing another child still living in the home! The remaining children were placed in foster care and the father is currently serving a year in the county jail. Because Nebraska has no Grandparents Rights Law, we have not been able to visit our grandchildren in foster care.

I wrote to 18 Nebraska senators about this and out of the 18, only Senator John McCollister responded to me. We recently met for coffee to discuss my concerns about this. He is planning on setting up a meeting with me, himself and another senator to see if we can come up with a solution that will allow grandparents visitation rights to grandchildren in foster care and protect children without violating the perpetrators’ civil rights.

Protecting our future

We have all heard politicians and others quote that “children are our future”. If that is true, (And I believe it is) then why are we so bent on destroying our own future? Adult survivors continue to deal with physical symptoms of sexual child abuse even when the abuse occurred long ago.

A 2001 study supported by the CDC showed that early childhood abuse could affect areas of the brain that impact language, cognitive and emotional development and mental health. This could result in hyperactivity and sleep problems. Another CDC study revealed that the risk of adult chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, obesity, high blood pressure, liver disease and high cholesterol is increased.

When a child is abused, emotional and psychological trauma can result. A long-term study by the CDC found that, “As many as 80 percent of young adults who had been abused met the diagnostic criteria for at least one psychiatric disorder at age 21.” These disorders include anxiety, depression, eating disorders and suicide attempts. Child abuse victims may also suffer from learning, attention and memory problems. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is another common problem for child abuse survivors, resulting in constant frightening memories and thoughts, feeling emotionally detached or numb and sleep problems.

Adults who suffered abuse often turn to drug or alcohol abuse. A report from the National Institute on Drug Abuse states that, “as many as 2/3 of people in drug treatment programs report being abused as children.” Additionally, some adult survivors turn to lying, stealing or other illegal criminal behavior and end up arrested and incarcerated.

Things you can do to protect your children:

  • Talk to your child about the dangers of sexual abuse. And talking about personal safety should be an on-going dialogue, not just a single event.
  • Teach your children appropriate names for their body parts.
  • Use everyday situations to keep the conversations about personal safety ongoing.
  • Set the rules about internet safety and your values early on.
  • Learn about the websites your children use regularly and limit how much time they spend online.
  • Visit websites such as Facebook, Twitter, and other sites your child visits.
  • Teach your children that they should not seek relationships with online friends and that they should never meet online friends in the real world. If you think that your child is smarter than that, think again. Many teens and pre-teens get involved in online relationships only to find out later that the “other teenager” is actually a middle aged pedophile. So make sure that your child has a support system in the real world.

Above all, build trust between you and your child so they know that they can talk to you about anything.

Think about this: I once attended a dedication ceremony of a friend who just had a baby. As the father was holding the baby in his arms, the pastor asked him, “Who are you to this child?” The father replied proudly, “I’m his father.” “No.” the paster answered. “You are God.” As the father gave the pastor a confused look, he continued, “You are the only God this child will know. So as far as he knows, you ARE God. And it is up to you to teach him all he will know about God.”

If we may be the only God that a child will know and that child experiences abuse from us or another adult, what will that child think  about God? What will his impression be of God?

Collin Raye – 11th Commandment 

Nearly every child in America now has a smart phone. For many parents, it makes it easier to keep track and stay in contact with their children. Unfortunately, they’re not the only ones who can track their child’s every move. Technology is also making it easier for strangers to track our children.

Your child’s iPhone has a hidden feature: It tracks and records their location constantly whether you want it to or not. And unless you’re a tech savvy parent, you may think there’s not much you can do about the tracking feature.

But it’s actually quite easy to disable the GPS tracking feature on your child’s iPhone to prevent applications from determining their location. When you disable the GPS, law enforcement officials can still track their device, but other applications, including the Family Locator service offered through both AT&T and Verizon Wireless, cannot.

Here’s how you do it:

Step 1

Press the “Home” button on your iPhone. Enter your four-digit passcode, if prompted.

Step 2

Tap “Settings” and “Location Services.” All of the services currently using the GPS feature of your phone are listed in the bottom panel of the screen.

Step 3

Touch the “Location Services” field to disable GPS tracking. The field now shows “Off.”

Step 4

Press the “Home” button to exit to the phone’s home screen.

Could a stranger on the Internet really track my child’s every move?

Yes — and easily — thanks to an app named Creepy.

All they have to do is type in a person’s Twitter or Flickr username, and hit the ‘Geolocate Target’ button. The app will then gather all the geographic information available online, via photos that the ‘target’ has shared online.

The reason the app can gather this information so easily is that whenever someone shares a photo taken with his or her smartphone, services like Flickr, Yfrog and Twitpic automatically record the location where the shot was taken, and store that geo-tag in the image’s EXIF data. Creepy pulls up that data and places it onto maps. If combined with details gleaned from tweets it can reveal information which could easily be abused by someone with evil intent like:

  • Where your child lives
  • Who else lives there
  • Where they attend school
  • Their route to and from school
  • Certain parks or shopping malls they visit on a regular basis

You might be a little nervous about seeing just how revealing an innocently uploaded photo can be, so you want to know: How do I protect my child?

It’s simple. Check the settings of the apps or websites they use to upload photos. Make sure that the geotagging features are turned off. And if you want to be extra safe, use an app to strip photos of geotags before uploading them such as: Geotag Security http://www.geotagsecurity.com

or Exifer http://download.cnet.com/Exifer/3000-2192_4-10142150.html

Many may think I’m taking an alarmist view of the world, but the truth is that we live in a world full of evil people. And given the fact that many judges and politicians do very little to punish those who would do harm to our children because of prison overcrowding, it is up to parents to make sure that our children remain safe.

Jesus said “I am sending you out like sheep among wolves. Therefore be as shrewd as snakes and as innocent as doves.” (Matthew 10:16)

The serpent is a very sharp sighted, cunning creature, and uses various strategies for its own preservation. So as followers of Christ, we are to make use of all proper methods to preserve ourselves (And our children) from the evils of men, and not expose ourselves or them to unnecessary dangers and to avoid all snares and traps that are laid for us.

Alone, the wisdom of the serpent is mere cunning, and the harmlessness of the dove little better than weakness; but in combination, the wisdom of the serpent will save us from unnecessary exposure to danger; the harmlessness of the dove, the ability to escape without sin.

Every 9 seconds in the US a woman is assaulted or beaten. Around the world, at least one in every three women has been beaten, coerced into sex or otherwise abused during her lifetime. Most often, the abuser is a member of her own family. Domestic violence is the leading cause of injury to women—more than car accidents, muggings, and rapes combined. Studies suggest that up to 10 million children witness some form of domestic violence every year.

Every year more than 3 million reports of child abuse are made in the United States involving more than 6 million children. The United States has one of the worst records among industrialized nations – losing on average between four and seven children every day to child abuse and neglect.

The prevalence of child sexual abuse (CSA) is difficult to determine because it is often not reported. But experts agree that the incidence is far greater than what is reported to authorities.

Now if you think that these type of crimes are reserved only for non-Christians, think again! Studies reveal that domestic violence and child sexual abuse is just as common within the evangelical churches as anywhere else. This means that about 25 % of Christian homes witness abuse of some kind!

Because these numbers are so shocking, you may be wondering if the studies were done by secular researchers hostile to the church. Sadly, they were not.

Denise George, a gifted writer and the wife of theologian Timothy George, has published a new book called What Women Wish Pastors Knew. “Spouse abuse shocks us,” George writes. “We just cannot believe that a church deacon or member goes home after worship . . . and beats his wife.” Tragically, however, George notes, some of these men justify their violence “by citing biblical passages.”

Well, obviously they’re misinterpreting Scripture to justify their actions. In Ephesians 5:22, husbands are told to love their wives as Christ loved the Church. Beating your wife black-and-blue hardly constitutes Christian love! 1 Peter 3:1-7 tells husbands to live with their wives considerately. And the Bible makes it clear that the Church has no business closing its eyes to violent men. In 1 Timothy 3:3, the church is told that when it comes to choosing leaders, they must find men who are “not violent but gentle,” sober, and temperate.

The amount of domestic abuse in Christian homes is horrifying, and the Church ought to be doing something about it! But sometimes pastors, albeit with good intentions, do more harm than good.

George sites a survey in which nearly 6,000 pastors were asked how they would counsel women who came to them for help with domestic violence. 26% said they would counsel them to continue to “submit” to her husband, no matter what. 25% told wives that the abuse was their own fault for failing to submit in the first place. Astonishingly, nearly half of the pastors surveyed said women should be willing to tolerate some level of violence because it is better than divorce! Do they not understand that advice like this often puts women in grave danger—and in some cases, can be a death warrant? Pastors need to acknowledge that domestic abuse in the Church is a problem, and learn how to counsel women wisely.

Equally as tragic is that child sexual abuse continues to destroy the bodies and souls of untold numbers of children around the country. In her book, “Predators, Pedophiles, Rapists, and other Sex Offenders”, clinical psychologist Anna Salter revealed that her own interviews of sexual offenders found them admitting to having perpetrated between 10 and 1250 victims! She also writes that every offender she interviewed had been previously reported by children, and the reports were ignored.

It is critical to note that this abuse is no less prevalent within the faith community. In fact, there are studies that demonstrate that the faith community is even more vulnerable to abuse than secular environments. The Abel and Harlow study revealed that 93% of sex offenders describe themselves as “religious” and that this category of offender may be the most dangerous. Other studies have found that sexual abusers within faith communities have more victims–and younger victims. This disturbing truth is perhaps best illustrated by the words of a convicted child molester who told Dr. Salter: “I considered church people easy to fool…they have a trust that comes from being Christians. They tend to be better folks all around and seem to want to believe in the good that exists in people.”

Approximately 1 in 4 women and 1 in 6 men have been sexually abuse as children. This means that a church of 200 members will have at least 41 child sexual abuse survivors, or over 20% of the congregation! Yet, sexual abuse is still too seldom talked about inside our churches. How would your church respond if: 20% of the congregation had cancer; or 20% of the congregation had lost a child; or 20% of the congregation had been fired from employment?
I would predict that any of these issues would become a primary focus of the church’s ministry. Pastors would preach sermons addressing the spiritual issues associated with this trauma and church members would reach out in love and service to those experiencing such deep hurt.
Then why does the Church refuse to respond to child sexual abuse in silence? As part of the body of Christ, we must learn to approach the horror of child sexual abuse no differently.
Perhaps these statistics can help drive our churches to become places of refuge and healing for abuse survivors who are silently suffering in our midst:

• 1 in 5 girls and 1 in 20 boys is a victim of child sexual abuse.
• Self-report studies show that 20% of adult females and 5-10% of adult males recall a childhood sexual assault or sexual abuse incident.
• During a one-year period in the U.S., 16% of youth ages 14 to 17 had been sexually victimized.
• Over the course of their lifetime, 28% of U.S. youth ages 14 to 17 had been sexually victimized.
• Children are most vulnerable to CSA between the ages of 7 and 13.

 

 

Are you in an abusive relationship? Below are warning signs of an abusive personality:

• Jealousy: Excessively possessive; calls constantly or visits unexpectedly; afraid that if you go anywhere by yourself “you might meet someone.”

• Controlling: Interrogates you intensely (especially if you’re late) about whom you talked to and where you were; controls all the money; insists you ask permission to do anything.

• Isolation: Tries to cut you off from family and friends; accuses people who support you of causing trouble. Puts down everyone you know- friends are either stupid, or slutty.

• Blames others for problems or mistakes: It’s always someone else’s fault when anything goes wrong.

• Makes others responsible for his feelings: The abuser says things like, “Why do you always do things that make me angry?”

• Hypersensitivity: Is easily insulted, uses hurt feelings to justify abusive behavior.

• Cruelty to animals and children: Kills or brutally punishes animals. Also may expect children to do things that are far beyond their ability (whips a 3-year-old for unintentional accidents) or may tease them until they cry.

• Verbal abuse: Constantly criticizes or says blatantly cruel, hurtful things. Degrades, curses, and calls you ugly names.

• Sudden mood swings: Switches from sweet to violent in minutes.

• Often makes threats: Says things like, “I’ll break your neck,” or “I’ll kill you,” and then dismisses them with, “Don’t take things so literal!”

• Breaking or striking objects during an argument: Slams fist on tables, punches walls, throws objects across a room, pushes, shoves, or physically restrains you from leaving room.

If you are in an abusive relationship with someone, get away! Call someone to help you–A friend, a women’s shelter or the police. It may just save your life and the lives of your children.

Because it rarely stops….

 

 

Resources to help:

https://www.whengeorgiasmiled.org/

http://www.thehotline.org/resources/resources/